Strong communication in corporate, political, health-related, tech innovation, and social advocacy contexts is crucial for the success and continued advancement of our society. Individuals who receive advanced training in communication are prepared for such important responsibilities as writing articles that educate the public about important issues, facilitating productive relationships between a company and its stakeholders, and advancing social and political causes. Master’s in communication programs enable students to gain skills in professional communication that can help them advance their career in marketing, public relations, political campaigning and advocacy, health communication, non-profit communication, and other fields of communication.

Online master’s in communication programs allow individuals who have professional and/or personal obligations that prevent them from traveling to campus or relocating for a degree program to complete their graduate degree in communication. While online programs may not be ideal for all students, additional advantages of online programs include:

  • Greater access to graduate programs, especially for students who do not live near a campus-based program
  • Access to specializations that may not be offered by a local college or university
  • Increased exposure to online communication technologies and a greater comfort in navigating these technologies, which may be advantageous for certain fields post-graduation
  • Flexibility for students who may be forced to relocate during their program, such as students in the military or spouses of service members
  • Ability to complete coursework and projects at any time of day without the need to attend classes at specific times (for programs that use asynchronous instruction)
  • Ability to view and review course materials, including recorded lectures, multiple times if needed to understand key course concepts

Students considering an online program need to be aware that online master’s programs often require more self-discipline and self-motivation compared to campus-based programs. This is due to the fact that students are responsible for keeping up with lectures and assignments without the structure of weekly campus-based lectures. Students need to be particularly self-guided and disciplined for online programs that use asynchronous instruction (see below) where students are not required to attend live lectures online.

Accessibility of Online Programs versus Campus Programs

The following map contains the location of all campus-based master’s in communication programs in the United States with a 20 mile radius around each campus (represented by the blue circles). For students who do not live within commuting distance to a campus, do not want to relocate to attend a graduate program, or who cannot commute to campus several times per week for lectures, online programs may be the only option for pursuing a master’s in communication.

Structure of Online Master’s in Communication Programs

There are a wide variety of online master’s in communication programs and understanding the different options is important for students as they research and compare programs. There are programs that are 100% online and do not require any campus visits, and programs that require a limited number of on-campus residencies. Both options have pros and cons depending on the student. For students who have personal or work obligations, it may not be possible to travel to campus for these sessions. However, for students who want to meet instructors and classmates in person for face-to-face instruction and networking, but who still want the flexibility of online instruction, these programs may be ideal. (Note: MastersinCommunications.com classifies a program as online if it requires students to attend two or fewer on-campus sessions per year. Programs that require more than two visits per year are classified as hybrid programs.)

In terms of instruction methods, there are programs whose course content is accessible 24/7 to enable students to fully determine their own schedule. There are also programs that incorporate live video discussions and other interactive learning technologies to maximize student-faculty and peer-to-peer interactions. For more information about instruction methods see below. Independent of the type of instruction method, students typically interact with instructors and classmates through online discussion forums; email, telephone and chat; and video conferencing if needed.

On top of these options, students of online master’s in communication programs have access to additional specialization options that may not be offered at a local university. MastersinCommunications.com currently classifies programs into 10 different concentrations according to their curricula. These specializations include organizational communication, strategic communication, health communication, public relations (PR) and marketing communication, political communication, and more. Students should note that while some schools offer the same concentrations in their online programs as they do in their campus-based programs, others may offer more or fewer concentrations in their online program. For example, a school may offer a campus program with multiple specializations while their online program focuses on just one like strategic communication.

When deciding which programs to consider, prospective students should take into account their current professional and personal obligations, geographical location, and their interests and professional objectives within the field of communication. Furthermore, prospective students should consider their learning preferences (e.g. more versus less structured) as well as how long they would like to take to complete their program (e.g. full-time versus part-time enrollment).

Curricular Structure of Online Master’s in Communication Programs

As with traditional on-campus programs, online master’s in communication programs are comprised of a combination of core coursework in the fundamentals of communication and concentration coursework in a student’s desired professional field post-graduation. Core courses may vary across programs, but generally cover concepts such as leadership in communication, communication laws and ethics, media and digital communication, and persuasive rhetoric. Concentration courses can vary widely and depend on a student’s desired focus.

The number of course credits required to complete a master’s in communication program varies somewhat by school and the student’s selected concentration, but is typically between 30 and 45 credits. Depending on the program and the number of credits students must take each term they are enrolled, students generally require between 12-24 months of full-time study or 24-36 months of part-time study in order to complete their program. However, some programs, especially online programs and programs designed for working adults, allow students to take as many or as few courses as they can per term, and to complete their degree over the course of 5-8 years if they wish. These credits may be divided as such:

  • 9-18 credits of foundational coursework: These classes cover topics such as the essential theories and principles of communication, how professionals can be leaders in communication, essential developments in communication (such as digital communication technologies and social media), the fundamentals of research in communication, and more.
  • 9-18 credits of specialization courses: These classes vary widely depending on a student’s chosen specialization, but examples of such courses may include strategic storytelling, social media strategies for corporations, political campaigning, rhetorical criticism, communication strategies for social advocacy, health communication, and marketing and public relations practices.
  • 3-9 elective credits: These classes present students with an opportunity to take courses in an area of communication that is outside of their selected specialization, but which is still of interest to them. For example, a student who is enrolled in an online master’s in strategic communication program may wish to take some courses that focus more on communication theory and rhetorical criticism, and therefore may take electives in these areas.
  • 3-6 credits for capstone or practicum: Some online master’s in communication programs require students to complete a project in their area of communication, and/or to complete a supervised practicum experience in a work setting that is relevant to their chosen specialization. Some online programs also offer students the option of completing a thesis, but currently, no online master’s in communication program requires a thesis to graduate (there are campus programs that require students to complete a thesis).

Online Master’s in Communication Specializations/Concentrations

While the majority of master’s in communications programs offer specializations, not all programs have distinct specialization tracks. Instead, some programs are designed to just emphasize one area in the field of communication or offer a general program that allows students to tailor their program based on the electives they choose to take. In addition, schools use different terminology to describe their programs and specializations. For example, strategic communication programs can be found with numerous different names including:

  • Master’s in Strategic Communication
  • Master of Arts in Strategic Communication
  • Master of Science in Strategic Communication
  • Master’s in Communication with a Specialization in Strategic Communication
  • Master’s in Communication with a Concentration in Strategic Communication
  • Master’s in Communication with an Area of Study/Focus in Strategic Communication
  • Master’s in Communication with an Emphasis in Strategic Communication
  • Master’s in Communication with a Focus Area in Strategic Communication
  • Master’s in Communication with a Path/Track in Strategic Communication

When researching and deciding between programs, students should consider whether or not they would prefer a program that offers a distinct track in a given specialization, with a set curriculum that covers the essential concepts within that specialization, or a more general program that offers a broader selection of courses across different disciplines in communication. Concentration options for students wishing to pursue their master’s in communication online include but are not limited to:

  • Online Master’s in Communication Studies: Students of online master’s in communication studies programs learn how to critique different types of human communication, from interpersonal to mass communication, and engage in research and analysis of human communication and connection in order to understand past and emerging trends in how humans craft and spread information.
  • Online Master’s in Global Communication: Master’s programs in global and/or international communication prepare students for managing global channels of communication, and for navigating complicated international communication issues. Students of these programs learn how to develop marketing or social advocacy campaigns that have global reach, how to handle international news and media initiatives, and how to take cultural and geographical differences into account when communicating with international audiences.
  • Online Master’s in Health Communication: Online master’s in health communication programs teach students about the important communications in the medical and health-related fields, including patient-provider interactions, medical and public health initiatives, and optimizing the channels of communications within institutions of medical care. Students of health communication may also learn about the principles of public relations and marketing communication for health companies.
  • Online Master’s in Mass Communication, Media, and Digital Communication: Students of online master’s programs in mass communication learn the theories behind how messages are conveyed to larger audiences, and how the latest communication technologies are leveraged to create and disseminate memorable messages in the corporate, political, and medical fields. Students of these programs learn skills that are relevant to creating impactful campaigns and other content to connect with communities at the local, national, and international levels.
  • Online Master’s in Organizational Communication: Online master’s in organizational and corporate communication programs teach students how information flows between individuals and groups within complex organizations, and equip them with advanced skills in internal and external-facing communication for organizations. Students learn the principles of organizational leadership, optimizing team dynamics, employee training and development, public relations and marketing principles, and how to develop clear messaging for employees and stakeholders.
  • Online Master’s in Political Communication: Students of online master’s in political communication programs learn about the role that communication plays in government operations, the development of sound policies, and effective campaigns for both politicians and political causes. Students learn how to create effective campaign media, how to write public policy communications, and how to navigate public relations issues for political groups and advocacy organizations.
  • Online Master’s in Public Relations, Marketing, and Integrated Marketing Communication: Master’s programs in PR and marketing communication train students to become experts in product positioning, creative and engaging storytelling that engages potential consumers, crisis communication, forging relationships with the media, and creating and maintaining a strong brand identity and reputation. Students of these programs learn how to navigate difficult PR dilemmas and how to forge strong relationships between a company and its various stakeholders.
  • Online Master’s in Strategic Communication: Online master’s in strategic communication programs teach students how to develop and implement communication initiatives that further the mission of organizations. Students of these programs learn how to engage in PR and marketing initiatives, organizational communication strategies, organizational leadership, social media campaigns, crisis communication, and advocacy initiatives.
  • Online Master’s in Technical Communication: Online master’s in technical communication programs give students the knowledge, methods, and skills to write and manage scientific and technical publications, such as scientific research articles, medical instructions, user manuals, and instructional content for people who use online or mobile applications. Students take courses such as the rhetoric of technical communication, technical publication management, user experience, grant and proposal writing, research writing, online content curation, and data visualization.

When determining which specialization to pursue in their online master’s in communication program, students should research the types of careers in communication that interest them and the knowledge and skills that these careers require. That way they can identify programs that will provide them with the targeted coursework, research opportunities, and or internship experiences they need to succeed in that field.

Graduation Requirements for Online Master’s in Communication Programs

In addition to completing the course credits required in their program, students of online master’s in communication programs may also have to fulfill additional requirements to graduate. These requirements may include but are not limited to:

  • A research capstone project (such as a professional project, published paper, or thesis)
  • A professional portfolio of work
  • A comprehensive examination at the end of their program
  • On-campus residencies, also known as on-campus intensives
  • An internship or practicum

Programs tend to vary in their research project, final examination, internship/practicum, and campus visit requirements. Most online master’s in communication programs are applied in nature, and therefore tend to have graduation requirements that help prepare students for more advanced work in industry. As a result, portfolio requirements, professional project requirements, and comprehensive examinations tend to be more common than thesis requirements for online master’s in communication programs, as theses tend to be more theoretical and prepare students for work in research or academia, or for doctoral studies. That said, there are some online programs that offer students the option of completing a thesis if it better aligns with their career and academic goals. There are also online programs that have no capstone requirements, but require students to take additional courses to meet the credit requirements for graduation.

Practicum or internship requirements are generally rare for online master’s in communication programs, due to the fact that many students in these programs are already full-time or part-time working professionals. However, some online programs give students the option of completing an internship in their area of specialization for course credit, which can be valuable for students who have recently graduated from college or who wish to pivot into a different industry. Other online programs require students to attend campus residencies once or twice a year; these residencies are typically multi-day intensive learning events in which students meet their faculty in person, collaborate on projects with peers, and/or engage with speakers or potential employers in networking or informational sessions.

Due to the variances in programs’ requirements with regards to final research projects, final examinations, and campus residencies, students should thoroughly research programs of interest to them prior to applying. To learn more about the graduation requirements that are common in online master’s in communication programs, please read through the information below.

Portfolio Requirements

Online master’s in communication programs may require students to create and submit a portfolio of their work in order to graduate. This portfolio may be comprised of work they have completed for their classes, during an internship, as part of a final project, or in their own professional work. Student portfolios can be in print or digital form (for example, a website with writing samples and other media), and students may be required to present their portfolios to classmates and/or faculty as part of one of their classes, or as part of their final examination. Professional portfolio requirements are helpful in that they provide a structured opportunity for students to review their best work and curate it for presentation both to faculty and to potential employers after they graduate. Many programs that have a portfolio requirement also ask that students write a retrospective report that identifies key learning outcomes they have achieved through their program, and how their portfolio reflects these outcomes.

Research Requirements

Research projects, whether theory-based or more practical in nature, are valuable opportunities for students to apply their graduate-level knowledge to a theoretical problem or real-world communication issue that interests them. Some, but not all, online master’s in communication programs require students to complete a capstone project, in the form of a professional project or a thesis, and most programs that have this requirement give students multiple options so that they can choose between a project that is more theoretical or practical in nature. In general, students’ work on their thesis or project counts for academic credit towards their degree.

Professional Project

Many online master’s in communication programs have a professional project requirement that involves students investigating an existing issue in their area of study (ex. public relations communication, organizational communication, health communication, etc.). Unlike a thesis, which is typically a multi-chapter document with a fairly formal structure, professional projects can take many forms, depending on the students’ interests. For example, a student of an online master’s in organizational communication program may choose to create a strategic communication plan for an organization, while a student of an online broadcasting journalism program might complete a video accompanied by an analytical paper.

The process for completing a professional project also varies from program to program, with some programs devoting a class to the capstone projects, while other programs assign students an individual advisor and committee that guides them through the process of completing their project. In general, students must think of a question or a problem in communication, submit a project proposal to faculty, and conduct intensive research and analysis to better understand the issue in question. Once they have completed sufficient research, students work on their project and present it to faculty and/or peers at the end of their last term in the program.

Master’s Thesis

A thesis is a scholarly research paper that investigates a research question and seeks to contribute unique insight into the field of communication through the collection, analysis, and discussion of data. Students typically begin thinking about their thesis topic during the second half of their program, after they have completed certain research prerequisite courses. To write their thesis, students must select a thesis advisor and committee members who will support them throughout the research process. They must then write a proposal that includes their desired research question and their plan for investigating this question, which they must submit to and present before their committee. Once their research question and plan are approved, students commence their research under the guidance of their advisor, and also seek input from their committee members. Upon completing their thesis, students submit it to their committee for review and also defend their thesis before this same committee. At this time, there are no online master’s in communication programs that require students to complete a thesis.

Capstone Examination Requirements

Some online master’s in communication programs require students to complete a comprehensive examination at the end of their program. For some programs, students can take this examination in lieu of completing a research thesis or capstone project. As examinations do not typically count as course credit, students in programs that give them a choice between a research project or a final assessment, and who elect to take the examination, may need to take additional classes in order to fulfill the credit requirements for their program.

The content of comprehensive final exams for master’s in communication programs varies depending on the program and a student’s selected concentration, but generally includes topics in communication theory, leadership, research, and communication strategies across multiple environments. For some examinations, students are presented with a case study or sample communication problem, and are required to develop an action plan that resolves this problem. In addition, these assessments can vary in form: while some programs may require students to take a written exam over the course of several hours, some programs require a multi-day examination that incorporates written, oral, and even group project elements.

On-Campus Intensives and Residencies in Online Programs

To strengthen student-faculty relationships and give students the opportunity to network with fellow students and potential employers, some online master’s in communication programs require students to attend one or more on-campus intensives (also known as campus residencies or immersion sessions) during their enrollment. For programs that require on-campus intensives, the format and timing of these sessions varies by program. For example, some programs ask that students attend a week-long orientation on-campus before the start of the program or require students to visit the campus every summer. Other programs maybe only require students to visit campus to defend their thesis or to complete their comprehensive examination. Finally, some programs may have their residencies at off-campus locations depending on the theme of the immersion session.

  • At this time, 5 out of 105 online programs require campus visits.

In general, students are expected to cover the costs of travel and lodging for on-campus intensives, as these costs are not typically included in university tuition or fees. Therefore, students should factor these costs into their overall budget when deciding between online programs. As noted above, MastersinCommunications.com, classifies an online master’s in communication program as one that requires two or fewer campus visits per year. Programs that require more than two campus visits per year are classified as hybrid programs.

Full-Time versus Part-Time Online Master’s in Communication Programs

Many online master’s in communication programs offer students both full-time and part-time courses of study (although some may only offer one enrollment option), so that students who wish to continue working during the completion of their degree have the option to do so. The definition of full-time and part-time enrollment has been less clear as schools have introduced alternative academic calendars with four-, five-, and eight-week terms. These shorter terms are designed to allow students to concentrate on fewer courses over a shorter period of time. For example, a student may take three five-week courses instead of three courses over a traditional 15-week semester. In both situations, a student may be considered as enrolled full-time.

Typically full-time enrollment is the equivalent of 9 graduate credit hours earned over a traditional 15-week semester. Students enrolled full-time can typically complete a program in 12-24 months depending on how many classes they take per term and if they enroll during the summer. Students attending part-time typically take 24-36 months to graduate, although some programs give students up to 5 to 8 years to finish the program. When deciding whether to pursue a degree full-time or part-time, students should weigh the benefits of completing their program sooner, versus being able to work more during their degree program. In addition, for students who plan to seek financial aid for their studies, eligibility may require students to enroll in a minimum number of credits per term. Therefore, students should contact programs to ask what is the minimum number of credits they must take to be eligible for financial aid. Below are sample full-time and part-time curriculum plans for an online master’s in public relations and marketing communication program:

Sample 2-Year Full-Time Curriculum Plan

 
Fall Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Year 1
Core Courses:
  • Leadership in Communication
  • Essential Theories of Communication

Core Courses:
  • Principles of Strategic Communication
  • Ethics in Communication
Concentration Courses:
  • Media, Technology, and Economics
  • The Theory and Practice of Public Relations
Year 2
Concentration Course:
  • Integrated Marketing Practices and Principles
Concentration Courses:
  • Designing Media and Marketing Campaigns
  • Public Relations for For-Profit and Non-Profit Orgs
Concentration Course:
  • PR/Marketing Applied Capstone Project or Individual Work on Portfolio

Sample 3-Year Part-Time Curriculum Plan

 
Fall Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Year 1
Core Course:
  • Leadership in Communication

Core Course:
  • Essential Theories of Communication
Core Course:
  • Principles of Strategic Communication
Year 2
Core Course:
  • Ethics in Communication
Core Course:
  • Integrated Marketing Practices and Principles
Concentration Courses:
  • The Theory and Practice of Public Relations
  • Media, Technology, and Economics
Year 3
Concentration Course:
  • Designing Media and Marketing Campaigns
Concentration Course:
  • Public Relations for For-Profit and Non-Profit Orgs
Concentration Course:
  • PR/Marketing Applied Capstone Project or Individual Work on Portfolio

Instruction Methods in Online Master’s in Communication Programs: Synchronous vs. Asynchronous Instruction

Online master’s in communication programs employ two main types of online instruction methods: synchronous and asynchronous instruction. Below is a description of each method of instruction, including their potential pros and cons. Some programs use almost exclusively asynchronous instruction, while other programs combine synchronous and asynchronous instruction to give students a balance between flexibility and real-time interactions with course faculty and classmates.

Synchronous instruction

Synchronous instruction is defined as any course content that requires students to log on at specified dates and times to participate in real-time lectures and discussions. Synchronous instruction typically entails students using a web camera to discuss course concepts with peers and instructors, or participating in online chat discussions for participation credit.

Synchronous instruction enables students to engage more directly with their instructors and classmates, thereby providing structure to their learning experience. For many students, this can enhance their learning outcomes and level of interest in their courses. Synchronous instruction also allows students to receive instant responses to questions they might have, approximating the feel of a traditional campus-based lecture setting. However, this mode of instruction is slightly less flexible than asynchronous instruction, as students must be online at scheduled times. Regardless of whether they employ synchronous instruction or not, all online master’s in communication programs have an asynchronous component, in the form of assignments and other reading materials that students schedule and complete on their own time.

Asynchronous Instruction

Asynchronous instruction is defined as the 24/7 access to course materials such as pre-recorded lectures and modules, written course materials, and self-paced examinations and assignments that are completed whenever the student has time. Programs that employ 100% asynchronous instruction do not require students to attend lectures in real time, allowing them more flexibility than is afforded to students of programs that employ synchronous instruction. However, with the flexibility of asynchronous instruction inherently comes fewer opportunities for students to directly engage with program faculty and classmates. Students should also note that, while these programs allow them to view course materials at their convenience, they still have set dates for exams and assignment submissions. They also typically require weekly participation in online discussion forums.

Some programs that use mostly or exclusively asynchronous instruction facilitate student-faculty and peer-to-peer interaction through online discussion forums or optional virtual office hours that students can attend to ask their instructors questions. Course faculty members for these programs are also generally available via email or phone for students’ questions. Please note that all online master’s in communication programs require students to exercise discipline to stay on top of their assignments and their course material. In particular, students of programs that employ mainly asynchronous instruction must remain diligent and organized, and create structure in their learning schedule so as not to fall behind in their lecture sequences.

State Authorizations and State Restrictions

An important consideration for individuals who wish to enroll in an online master’s in communication program is whether the program(s) they are considering is authorized to accept students from their state of residence. Independent of accreditation, universities that offer online programs must apply for and receive state authorization in order to operate in and enroll students from states where they do not have a physical campus. States vary in the requirements they ask schools to fulfill in order to receive this authorization, and some states even require school’s to apply for approval from multiple state agencies before it can start advertising to and enrolling their residents.

Universities that have not received authorization from a particular state (including schools that have applied for authorization but have not yet received approval) are typically not allowed to enroll students from that state until they have been granted authorization. While MastersinCommunications.com has done its best to provide this information to prospective students, state authorizations do change over time. For the most up to date information, students should contact the admissions office or an admissions advisor before applying to an online program.

The recent increase in online program offerings in the United States has motivated many states to try and simplify the process of obtaining authorization for quality online graduate and undergraduate programs. The National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements (SARA) is an organization that seeks to standardize the requirements for state authorization for schools with online programs. Many states have voluntarily joined SARA, and states within this agreement agree to hold online programs to the same education standards and quality assurance methods. SARA does not waive the process that schools must undergo in order to receive state authorizations; however it both streamlines and expedites this process for schools when they apply to states that have opted into the SARA agreement. Students who wish to learn more about SARA and whether their state has opted into it can find information at the National Council for State Authorization Reciprocity Agreements website.

Online Master's in Communication Degree Programs

To learn more about the programs listed below, click on the program name to visit the school profile page.
Filter Online Programs by Specialization:

Arizona State University

(Arizona)
Department: College of Integrative Sciences and Arts
Program(s): Department: Hugh Downs School of Human Communication
Program(s):

Asbury University

(Kentucky)

Boston University

(Massachusetts)
Department: College of Communication and Metropolitan College
Program(s):

Bowling Green State University

(Ohio)

Brenau University

(Georgia)
Department: College of Business & Communication
Program(s):

California Baptist University

(California)
Department: Department of Communication Arts / Online and Professional Studies
Program(s):

Concordia University, Saint Paul

(Minnesota)
Department: College of Business and Technology
Program(s):

East Carolina University

(North Carolina)

Eastern Illinois University

(Illinois)

Eastern New Mexico University

(New Mexico)

Edinboro University of Pennsylvania

(Pennsylvania)

Florida International University

(Florida)

Fordham University

(New York)
Department: Gabelli School of Business
Program(s):

Franklin University

(Ohio)
Department: Ross College of Business
Program(s):

Kent State University

(Ohio)
Department: School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Program(s):

Liberty University

(Virginia)
Department: Department of Strategic and Personal Communication
Program(s):

Lynn University

(Florida)

Marist College

(New York)
Department: School of Communication and the Arts
Program(s):

Marquette University

(Wisconsin)
Department: Graduate School of Management, Diederich College of Communication
Program(s):

Michigan State University

(Michigan)
Department: College of Communication Arts and Sciences
Program(s):

Minnesota State University, Mankato

(Minnesota)
Department: Communication Studies Department
Program(s): Department: English Department
Program(s): Department: English Department, Communication Studies Department
Program(s):

Missouri University of Science and Technology

(Missouri)
Department: Department of English and Technical Communication
Program(s):

Morehead State University

(Kentucky)
Department: Department of Communication, Media and Languages
Program(s):

Murray State University

(Kentucky)

National University

(California)
Department: College of Letters and Sciences
Program(s):

New Jersey Institute of Technology

(New Jersey)
Department: Department of Humanities
Program(s):

Northern Arizona University

(Arizona)

Northwestern University

(Illinois)
Department: Medill School of Journalism, Media, Integrated Marketing Communications
Program(s):

Notre Dame of Maryland University

(Maryland)
Department: Communication Arts Department
Program(s):

Ohio University

(Ohio)
Department: Scripps College of Communication, School of Communication Studies
Program(s):

Park University

(Missouri)
Department: Department of Communication Arts
Program(s):

Penn State World Campus

(Pennsylvania)
Department: Donald P. Bellisario College of Communications
Program(s):

Point Park University

(Pennsylvania)

Queens University of Charlotte

(North Carolina)

Rider University

(New Jersey)
Department: College of Liberal Arts and Sciences
Program(s):

Rutgers University

(New Jersey)

South Dakota State University

(South Dakota)

Southern New Hampshire University

(New Hampshire)

Southern Utah University

(Utah)

Spring Arbor University

(Michigan)

St Bonaventure University

(New York)
Department: Jandoli School of Communication
Program(s):

Stephen F Austin State University

(Texas)

Stevenson University

(Maryland)
Department: Stevenson University Online
Program(s):

The College of New Rochelle

(New York)

The University of Alabama

(Alabama)

The University of Iowa

(Iowa)
Department: School of Journalism and Mass Communication
Program(s):

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

(North Carolina)
Department: School of Media and Journalism
Program(s):

Troy University

(Alabama)
Department: Hall School of Journalism and Communication
Program(s):

University of Central Florida

(Florida)

University of Central Missouri

(Missouri)
Department: School of Communication, History, and Interdisciplinary Studies
Program(s):

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

(Illinois)
Department: Department of Communication
Program(s): Department: Gies College of Business and Sandage Department of Advertising (College of Media)
Program(s):

University of Southern California

(California)

University of Wisconsin-Stout

(Wisconsin)
Department: College of Arts, Communication, Humanities and Social Sciences (CACHSS)
Program(s):

Utah State University

(Utah)
Department: Department of English
Program(s):

Washburn University

(Kansas)
Department: Communication Studies Department
Program(s):

Washington State University

(Washington)

Western New England University

(Massachusetts)
Department: College of Arts and Sciences
Program(s):